STUDIO DABBENI
Gianni Monnet

 Giovanni Monnet was born on 12 May 1912 in Turin, the son of Eugenio, an electrical engineer, and of Elisa Thöni.

After graduating from secondary school (an artistic lyceum), he enrolled in the Faculty of Architecture at Turin Polytechnic, where he was awarded a degree in 1937. That same year he moved to Rome, where he worked with the constructor Ingegner Ferrari to build Ciampino Airport.

In 1938 he passed his state exam for the Scuola Superiore d’architettura (Secondary Architecture School); at first he collaborated with the architects Antonio Valente and Guido Fiorini to create the set designs for several films, and then he participated, along with the architects Alberto Rosso and Giuseppe Lorini, in a tender for the new building of the National Opera in Belgrade. He and  Andrej Andreev made set designs for the movie La principessa Tarakanova,  filmed at Cinecittà.

In  1939 he moved back to Turin where he collaborated on the construction of several buildings for the Breda plant, and later on the installation design for both the EA2 exhibition in Rome, and the Alpinismo show in Turin.

In 1940 he collaborated on the design for the temporary buildings for the “Biennale dell’Autarchia” in Turin, and on the construction of a villa in Casalborgone.

In addition to his work as an architect, in the following years Monnet was a critic and an artist.

He mounted his first exhibition in 1944 in Lugano, at the Circolo Ticinese di Cultura (directed by Renato Regli and Giuseppe Martinola); the exact location was Palazzo Riva in Via Pretorio, where the artist presented works made between 1929 and 1944. He debuted early as a painter, making figurative works, particularly family portraits, as well as landscapes and some still lifes, in which Post-Cubist elements were already visible. A second exhibition was held at the same venue in 1947; Monnet showed twenty paintings, along with abstract paintings and sculptures by Ettore Sottsass Jr. Luigi Quadrelli wrote an essay introducing Monnet’s work, while Max Bill presented that of Sottsass.

In 1946, when the war ended, Monnet moved to Milan. His house-cum-studio was in Via Tarquinio Prisco, and he lived there with his wife Antonietta, whom he had married in 1940, and who was the daughter of the famous psychiatrist and humanist Bruno Manzoni. For a period of time Ettore Sottsass was a guest of theirs; together they shared an architecture studio.

However, the house in Lugano would always be an important point of reference for the artist, not just because of his collaborations as an art and architecture critic for the Corriere del Ticino and Radio Monteceneri (whose cultural service was directed by Felice Filippini), but also owing to his strong human and intellectual rapport with Renato Regli and with his father-in-law Bruno Manzoni, who played an important role Monnet’s his artistic and theoretical research, fueled by an ever-increasing interest in the sponteaneous painting of the alienated, also inspired by his study of the work of Miró and Surrealism.

In 1947 he took part in the exhibition “Arte italiana d’oggi” Turin prize, displaying the work Partita a  scacchi. In Milan he also began teaching construction at the Istituto Tecnico per Geometri, and working on various architectural projects. In particular, he won second prize (no first prize was awarded) for a project for two-storey houses for war veterans, called QT8 (the model experimental quarter of the 8th Milan Triennale) in collaboration with the architects Avetta, Romano, Sottsass Sr. and Sottsass Jr. (Ettore). Drawings and photographs were published in the Roman magazine Metron in September 1948. The houses were inaugurated on 23 October 1948. Furthermore, the jury paid the group the expenses it had incurred for a project for four-bed row houses. Also for QT8, Monnet participated, but unsuccessfully, in the project for a church, in collaboration with the architect Norberto Vairano (see Arte Concreta no. 3). It was Gianni Monnet’s first attempt to integrate the arts.

That same year he won first prize, ex aequo with Enrico Bordoni, for the Concorso Italviscosa for “Disegni per tessuti operati” (Designs for Worked Fabrics); the artist had entered a triple-weave lampas (see Ill. col. issue no. 36 of Tessili Nuovi, Milan, June 1948).

In 1948 he mounted three canvases for “Arte Astratta in Italia”, hosted by the Teatro delle Arti in Rome; he also participated in the season’s inaugural exhibition at Galleria Bergamini in Milan, the “Mostra del Cambio” in Chiavari, the 2nd Milan Internazionale, and the group show at Borromini in Milan.

In 1947, in Milan, the exhibition “Arte Astratta e Concreta”, organized by the architect Lanfranco Bombelli Tiravanti and the group “L’altana”, was held in the rooms of the Palazzo ex-Reale; it was the first exhibition of international value to be held in Italy. The exhibition poster was designed by Max Huber, and the catalogue curated by Bombelli included texts by Wassily Kandinsky, Max Bill, Georges Vantongerloo, and Ettore Sottsass Jr. The artists invited to the exhibition included: Arp, Bassi, Bill, Bodmer, Bombelli, Bonini, Graeser, Herbin, Hinterreiter, Huber, Kandisky, Klee, Leuppi, Licini, Lohse, Mazzon, Munari, Rho, Sottsass Jr., Taeuber-Arp, Vantongerloo, Veronesi, Vordemberge-Gildewart. This event played a major role in re-establishing a dialogue with those artists who had embraced the Second Futurist movement in the pre-war period, among whom Munari, or experiences that gravitated around the group that would meet at the Galleria del Milione: Radice, Reggiani, Ghiringhelli, among others.

Some of the artists also embraced the MAC (Movimento Arte Concreta) founded in Milan in 1948 by Gianni Monnet along with Gillo Dorfles, Bruno Munari and Atanasio Soldati.

The group, whose artists were involved in a variety of genres, was headquartered in the Libreria Salto, in Milano, which had been an important meeting place for modernist architects and artists.

The Libreria Salto opened in Milan in 1933, in Via Santo Spirito under the name “Libreria A. Salto, Architettura e Decorazione”. Founded by Alfonso Salto and later directed by his two sons, Giuseppe and Giancarlo; it was thanks to their erudition open to European artistic thinking that the book store ended up playing an invaluable role in the Milanese and Italian scenario after the war. The magazines Domus, Casabella, Spazio and the French publication Art d’Aujourd’hui were distributed by the Salto. In Via Santo Spirito the group’s openness towards a series of exhibitions was “automatic”, and the collaboration with Gianni Monnet was crucial with regard to the expansion towards new informative instruments.

Monnet had intended to group together artists who were inspired by the non-figurative avant-gardes, the idea also being to overcome the provincialism that prevailed at the time, in relation to the attempt to reconstruct an artistic discourse that had been broken for some time.

Monnet would always play the role of the divulger, which was of essential importance to the opposition manifested by the group as concerned the official line represented by realism, just as he had already had a chance to show on the occasion of the Rome exhibition “Arte Astratta in Italia”, his own principles, in a text published in the Corriere del Ticino. In it he discussed the predominance of form over content, indicating abstraction as being the extreme and inevitable outcome achieved by all modern art, starting from Impressionism, towards a universal language that would be affirmed internationally: the work exhibited entitled Pittura was unquestionably abstract. 

This predominance of the form directly corresponded, starting from the 1950s, to the artistic research carried out by Monnet, and expressed in his painting.

From 15 December 1948 to 3 January 1949 he participated in the “I Mostra di  giocattoli d’artisti” at Annunciata Gallery in Milano, organized by Munari, Noe, and Bruno Grossetti; the artist showed a Surrealist acquarium entitled Acquario figurato and a large-scale collage. An important testimony of this event is provided to us by the photography of Giancolombo, published in the magazine Grazia, and by the articles that came out in other periodicals at the time. In late December 1949 (17 - 30 December) again in the spaces of Annunciata Gallery for the “II Mostra regali per natale”, Gianni Monnet showed the work Parete animata, made for the occasion and exhibited the following year at the Libreria Salto as well: Bruno Munari’s input is evident in an exhibition where the works (made by Gillo Dorfles, Lucio Fontana, Max Huber, Ettore Sottsass and Luigi Veronesi) bear titles like Palle di Gomma, Paraventi, Macchine Inutili, Draghi cinesi, Lume in un sifone, Fossili per diecimila, Biciclette con regia Artistica.

The MAC’s debut show at the Libreria Salto on 22 December 1948 presented the 1st Portfolio of Concrete Art, consisting of twelve prints made by hand by Piero Dorazio, Gillo Dorfles, Lucio Fontana, Augusto Garau, Mino Guerrini, Galliano Mazzon, Gianni Monnet, Bruno Munari, Achille Perilli, Atanasio Soldati, Ettore Sottsass and Luigi Veronesi, with a critical essay by Giuseppe Marchiori. It was the start of MAC’s important publishing activity for the Libreria Salto, to be followed by the portfolio 10 litografie originali by Enrico Bordoni, with a text by Gillo Dorfles; Litografie originali di Monnet; 24 litografie originali by Afro, Bombelli, Bordoni, Dorfles, Fontana, Garau, Huber, Mazzon, Monnet, Munari, Soldati, Veronesi, with a text by Giulio Carlo Argan; 10 Forme 1949 by Luigi Veronesi, with a text by Gillo Dorfles;  10 Incisioni originali Di Salvatore, with a preface by André Bloc and a text by Nino Di Salvatore, 1951; Carol Rama, 5 lithographs produced in 1956; Simonetta Vigevani Jung, 6 lithographs, also made in 1956.

MAC’s publishing activity also led to the production of excellent publications with a fine graphic content: the first two bulletins (in a horizontal forma) corresponding to the years 1949-1950 and 1950-1951, the twenty-four bulletins (in a square format) that collected the group’s activity from 1951 to 1954, four publications entitled Documenti d’Arte d’Oggi with the group’s activity from 1954 to1958, and six Sintesi delle arti,  publications made from 1955 to 1956.

These publications were the outcome of the movement’s intensive exhibition activity and theoretical expression. Characterized by the graphic work of Munari and Monnet, they systematically provide details of the exhibitions, accompanied by the critical essays and other interventions. Gillo Dorfles’s essays were present in several publications. The covers designed by the artists and the original graphic art inside became full-fledged “artists books”, a unicum on the Italian art scene.

In 1949 Monnet mounted two solo shows at the Libreria Salto, the first  (from 2 to 15 April) with sixteen works, introduced by an essay by Gillo Dorfles (see Arte Concreta 1949-1950, sheet no. 9). Exhibited in Causa ed effetto for the first time ever are the circular elements joined by straight lines, while Forma primitiva represents one of the artist’s first attempts to use curvilinear, arched, rounded motifs in matte colours to create compositions of a minimal nature and primary aspect.

The second exhibition (from 8 to 21 October) included several temperas and the lithographs of the 3rd Portfolio of Concrete Art (Arte Concreta 1949-1950, sheet no.15). Undulating linearisms prevail in the lithographs. For Monnet, form cannot be identified with a rigid geometric abstraction, which he rejects.

The artist also began making collages, merging the technique and the colour of Matisse’s papiers découpés with biomorphous elements that are a nod to Arp and Kandinsky’s last works. He took part in the exhibition of the 4th Portfolio of Concrete Art at the Libreria Salto.

That same year (June1949) Monnet was invited to the exhibition Arte d’Oggi at Palazzo Strozzi in Florence.

In 1950 he participated in the MAC group exhibition at the Grifo gallery in Turin (22 February), (Arte Concreta 1949-1950, unnumbered sheet). “Opere concrete di sette artisti milanesi” was hosted immediately afterwards at the Circolo di Cultura di Lugano, with an introductory conference on abstract art given by Monnet and Munari. Monnet showed Metamorfosi (1949), a work in which the forms that seem to refer to biomorphous elements determine a juxtaposition of black and white fields against a blue background.

He took part in the MAC show at Vigna Nuova gallery in Florence and in the Modern Art show in Chieri.

From 6 May 1950, at the Naviglio run by Carlo Cardazzo in Milan, he participated in the group show  “Pittura Astratta e Concreta” (Arte Concreta 1949-1950, sheet no. 27), with Bertini, Crippa, Dova, Fontana, Giancorazzi, Joppolo, Licini, Munari, Parnisari, Reggiani, Soldati, Vedova, Veronesi, and he displayed a “negative-positive” in diagonal and a horizontal painting with circular elements.

From 7 to 20 October 1950 he showed his work at the Libreria Salto along with Galliano Mazzon; the introduction was by Mario Ballocco. Monnet again showed Parete animata,1949 (all that is left of this work which has since been destroyed is a series of black and white photographs and a design in tempera on paper): this work reveals Monnet’s desire to relate his painting to the surrounding space (for the illustrations see Arte concreta 1950-1951).

From 15 to 29 December he curated the show “Pitture di Albino Galvano e Filippo Scroppo” at the Libreria Salto, (Arte Concreta 1950-1951, unnumbered sheet).

In 1950 he participated in the 5th Salon des Réalités Nouvelles in Paris, as a member of the society. In the French capital he also consolidated his work as a critic, coming into contact with numerous exponents of the international artistic scene: André Bloc, Louis Degand, Charles Estienne, Michel Seuphor, whom he meet in the main galleries of the city and while visiting the studios of Jean Arp, Alberto Magnelli, and George Vantongerloo. The encounter proved to be important, and was continued to be nurtured by the artist’s correspondence with Nina Kandinsky, who allowed him to see her husband’s studio and private collection. Monnet’s strong relationship with Magnelli was also responsible for solidifying the relations between Paris and Italy.

That same year the artist’s began collaborating with the Paris magazine Art  d’Aujourd’hui, contributing articles about Italian art to the Milan magazine AZ-arte d’oggi.

In 1951 he showed his work at the Movimento Espace foundation in Paris; at the 4th Salon des Réalites Nouvelles in Paris; at “Arte astratta e concreta in Italia” (3-28 February) hosted by the Galleria nazionale d’arte moderna di Roma, participating at the same time, as a speaker, in the meeting entitled “Poetiche dell’Arte concreta, oggi” (5 February). On that occasion he presented a Forma elementare from 1950 in addition to the negative-positive Ossessione (Spazio, II [1951], 4, p. 48). These minimal forms aspired to transcend the traditional surface of the painting: this is demonstrated by a series of contemporary ink on photography works, in which the artist designed wall decorations for the interiors, resorting to numerous variations on the theme of the above-mentioned Forma elementare; at the Galleria Bompiani (7 - 16 April) in Milan in the 2nd Mostra Concretisti Italiani, curated by Gillo Dorfles with Bertini, Bombelli, Di Salvatore, Dorfles, Galli, Dova, Huber, Mazzon, Munari, Nigro, Regina, Rho, Soldati, Veronesi (Arte Concreta 1950-1951, unnumbered sheet) and then from 13 to 26 October at the “Mostra di Arte Concreta” in the Galleria Bergamini, Milan, with Biglione, Di Salvatore, Dorfles, Mazzon, Munari, Pantaleoni, Parisot, Regina, and Soldati.

The following galleries in Milan were the galleries of reference along with the Libreria Salto for MAC’s exhibitions: Bompiani, Bergamini, del Fiore, Schettini, Naviglio run by Carlo Cardazzo, L’Annunciata run by Bruno Grossetti.

However, we must not overlook the important contribution of Guido Le Noci (1904-1983) who, before founding Apollinaire gallery, an exhibition space designed by the architect Vittoriano Viganò (who had designed the del Fiore gallery in 1953 and the Schettini gallery in 1955), was involved in several projects for Bompiani, where he inaugurated two exhibitions: “Arte Astratta italiana: i primi astrattisti italiani 1913-1940”, and “II Mostra di Concreti Italiani”, respectively.

The first exhibition especially underscored the rediscovery of the work of Giacomo Balla, an essential figure for the movement; Arte concreta no. 2, 1951 would publish a detail from his 1918 painting Linee Andamentali.

Indeed, whereas in Rome it was the Origine group that rediscovered the artist, headed by Ettore Colla who had an exhibition space, and also thanks to the pages of Arti Visive, in  Milano it was Monnet who was drawn to him (for whom he created the drawing for the second cover of Arte Concreta) as was Guido Le Noci, who considered him the most important pioneer for the historical exhibition dedicated to abstract art at Bompiani (February 1951) and naturally for the following retrospective “Pitture astratte di Giacomo Balla dal 1912 al 1920” at the Amici di Francia (10 November - 2 December 1951), a space located at Corso Vittorio Emanuele 31, Milano.

We discovered that this very important show, which has been completely forgotten by the artistic historiography, is documented by the photographic reporting of Giancolombo.

Gianni Monnet worked hard to spread the word about the Milan exhibition, taping a show called “L’astrattista Balla a Milano” (23 December 1951) for Swiss-Italian Radio Monteceneri’s “Attualità culturali”.

For the Bompiani show, Monnet, with the collaboration of Bruno Munari and Giulia Sala, curated the graphics, the bulletin, and an introductory essay.

After writing for Corriere lombardo (35 articles), with weekly correspondence on the subject of modern art from Paris, Monnet began a fruitful collaboration with the weekly Epoca; the most famous text he wrote for the magazine was “L’Arte Moderna, dalla A alla Z” (no. 52), which dealt with the so-called history of “isms”, from Impressionism to Synthetism; other articles focused on Kandinsky (no.13) and Magnelli, the history of interior decor, the major avant-garde art galleries in Milan. Monnet also collaborated on the bulletin for the “Permanente” in Milan, and he studied the work of the architect Carboni for the Zurich magazine Graphis (no. 34).

His collaboration with the Paris magazine Art d’Aujourd’hui, allowed him to constantly update the debate on Italian art; he also wrote a weekly column on interior decor for Grazia (nos. 397 to 514)

Monnet had numerous and important relationships with artists, including young Roman abstract artists: Dorazio, Guerrini, Perilli, the theorists of the “Forma” movement, which shared with MAC the ideality of opposition to realism. All the tendentially progressive Roman artists took part in the MAC shows in Milan (Accardi, Manisco, Sanfilippo, Ettore Colla who, along with the Milanese Mario Ballocco, founded the Origine group, to name just a few). During the same period he met the architect from Locarno Oreste Pisenti: the exhibition of the German artist Arend Fuhrmann at Galleria Bergamini in Milano is proof of this contact (Bollettino MAC no. 2, 1951).

In 1952 Monnet took part in the 7th Salon des Réalites Nouvelles in Paris.

Monnet was interested in the principle of the integration of the arts and their interdisciplinary nature, including industrial production, graphic art, installations, decor, and, of course, architecture. This concept is clearly linked to the “Synthesis of the Arts” theorized by Le Corbusier. The following statements are enlightening: ““I am an architect and I have never seen any difference  between architecture, painting and sculpture; I believe that there is only one issue at stake: that of expressing oneself through the visual presentation of geometric spatial configurations (…)”. “Since the late nineteenth century (..) the visual arts have unconsciously and increasingly tended to merge in a single form of expression. But it  was not until Le Corbusier and Léger that this tendency became conscious: with Synthèse des Arts Plastiques we began to understand that abstract painting and sculpture are no longer canvases and statues according to the nineteenth-century definition of these words (..), but, rather, architecture, installation, industrial design. This is undoubtedly the role of art today, and the truly modern artist must aim at its realization”. Monnet concluded: “Based on the above statement, I believe that I legitimately belong to the Movimento Arte Concreta (…)”. (In: Tristan Sauvage, Pittura italiana del dopoguerra, Schwarz Editore, Milan, 1957, pp. 331-32.)

Hence, the idea was to achieve the perfect collaboration between the plastic arts and industry. Architecture was to encompass painting, sculpture, the production of everyday objects. In 1952 and  in 1954 this concept would be expressed in the exhibition “Studi per nuove forme di motociclette”, promoted by the Gilera and Innocenti companies and hosted by Galleria dell’Annunciata in Milan in 1952, as well as in “Colori nelle carrozzerie d’auto”, owing to the collaboration between the architects of Studio b24 in Milano, in collaboration with the Montecatini-Ducco company (before the exhibition, the creation of a stand) in 1954.

From 5 to 25 January 1952 Monnet took part in the exhibition “Forme concrete nello spazio realizzate in materiale plastico” curated by Lodovico Castiglioni and hosted at the Saletta dell’Elicottero in Milan; there he showed Stati d’animo 1951 (Coll. Museo Cantonale d’Arte, Lugano), works made from synthetic material such as rhodoid. (Arte Concreta, no. 2). Again in the Saletta dell’Elicottero, from 11 to 31 January MAC presented “Materie plastiche in forme concrete” with Casarotti, Di Salvatore, Donzelli, Dorfles, Fontana, Garau, Mazzon, Munari, Nigro, Pantaloni, and Regina. The materials used were: rhodoid, sicofoil, celluloid, plexiglas, perspex, plastic laminates.

Another concept put forward by Monnet, and expressed in a text he wrote for his solo show at Galleria Bergamini in Milan (19 January - 1 February 1952) was the criterion of “the impersonal” which was to emerge as a distinguishing feature of modern times. Afterwards, he and Munari curated the installation of the exhibition “Opere recenti di Soldati” at Galleria Bergamini.

From 9 to 29 February he took part in the MAC exhibition held in Vienna at the Italienischen Kulturinstitut (1952) and, during the same period, he designed the Centro Studi Arte e Industria in Novara, directed by Nino Di Salvatore. Unfortunately, the centre was never built.

He wrote two texts, which were published in two issues (nos. 6 and 7) of Arte Concreta, for the exhibitions “Opere recenti ed un plastico di Nino Di Salvatore” at Galleria Bergamini (26 April- 9 May),  and “opere concrete di Garau” (1 - 15 June) at Lagomarsino in Pavia.

Also in 1952, Gianni Monnet took part in three MAC exhibitions, in Latin America, in Rosario, Santa Fe (Amigos del Arte), Santiago del Chile (Universidad Cattolica), Buenos Aires (Galleria Krayd), and later in MAC’s group show (15 to 15 November) at Galleria Gissi in Turin.

He participated in “Arte organica, Disintegrismo, Macchinismo, Arte Totale e Danger Public”, with Munari, Veronesi, Mariani, Motta, Asinari, Regina, Di Salvatore, Muggiani, Tovaglieri, Iliprandi, Tullier, Franchini, Colombo, Baj, Dangelo (16 December 1952 - 6 January 1953), organized at the Galleria dell’Annunciata in Milan, where he signed the Manifesto dell’Arte Totale (Manifesto of Total Art).

In 1953 Monnet participated in the MAC show at Galleria S. Matteo in Genoa. He collaborated on the magazine Prospettive with a study on Picasso. In Paris he showed his work at the 7th Salon des Réalites Nouvelles. He began working with Studio b24 in Milan where he showed his work in “Collezione ambientale”; he wrote the introductory essay “Sintesi artistica con ceramiche di Garau” (see Arte Concreta, no.15) and he also showed at the group exhibition “Collezione Ambientata” (3 - 23 October) (see Documenti d’arte d’Oggi, 1954 and Arte Concreta, nos. 16/17).

He was a member of the board for the exhibition “Arte e Tecnica” (also doing the graphic art for the bulletin).

He developed his studies on primitive forms, finding their essence in an arched element that he repeated in several paintings, to which he associated circular forms; these results were directly related to the graphics, especially to Enten Eller, 1954, published by MAC, in which the poems of Antonino Tullier (painter, poet, and critic, born in 1916, and a member in 1952 of the Movimento Nucleare with Baj, Dangelo, Joe Colombo, and Mariani) are graphically portrayed by Gianni Monnet.

In  1954 he collaborated with the architects Mario Ravegnani and Antonello Vincenti on the “Casa sperimentale” for the 10th Milan Triennale.

He wrote the introductions for the exhibitions “Pitture recenti di Proferio Grossi” at Studio b24 and “Dino Caruso, Michele Santonocito” at the Galleria La Botteghina in Catania.

He participated in the international Espace exhibition in Biot and in the 9th Salon des Réalites Nouvelles in Paris.

In 1956 he produced the graphic design for the cover of the magazine Serigrafia, Arte Tecnica ed Economia del quarto sistema di stampa (I, 6, 3.09.1956).

The series of Swiss-Italian Radio Monteceneri shows (25) called “L’arte moderna dalla A alla Z” were again part of Monnet’s efforts to foster the public’s awareness of art; the scripts were later published in book form under the same title by the Libreria Salto in 1955.

 

In 1955 he participated in “Esperimenti di sintesi delle arti” at Galleria del Fiore in Milan and in the Paris shows of Groupe Espace at Parc de Saint-Cloud and at the 9th Salon des Réalites Nouvelles.

For Salto publishers in Milano he wrote “Sulla regolazione  del traffico a Milano”, part of a project concerning traffic in Milan.

In 1956 Monnet collaborated with the architect Tito Bassanesi Varisco on a project for the Pellicceria Livio Levi in Milan. Monnet’s job was to create four large wall mirrors and four sliding shutters for a wall closet. In both cases the work was done in oil directly on the material. While the shutters remind us of Parete animata, 1949, the mirrors, on the contrary, are reminiscent of elements of MAC’s third portfolio.

Along with the architect Varisco, Monnet also undertook the writing of an essay called Geometria percettiva, of which he was to publish a summary in Documenti d’arte d’oggi (1958, pp. 91 and ff.).

In 1957 he wrote an introduction to the exhibition “Dipinti e sculture di Angelo Bozzola” hosted by the Galleria del Fiore (24 November - 7 December).

He participated in “MAC/Espace. I Rassegna nazionale di Arte Concreta” held at Schettini gallery (30 March - 11 April).

In 1958 he showed some pastels in a solo show at the Libreria Salto library, with a text by Antonino Tullier (17 - 30 May). 

Monnet died at a young age on 15 December 1958 in Lugano.

 

 

 


Studio per progetto parietale, 1950
Temper and collage on paper
30,7 x 22,5
Studio per progetto parietale, 1950
Temper and collage on paper
30,7 x 22,5
Studio per progetto parietale, 1950
Temper and collage on paper
30,7 x 22,5
Studio per progetto parietale, 1950
Temper and collage on paper
30,7 x 22,5
Foto di gruppo dei membri del M.A.C alla libreria Salto di Milano. Da sinistra a destra, in piedi: Veronesi, Salto ji., Munari, Di Salvatore, Mazzon; seduti: Soldati, Regina, Giulia Mazzon Sala,Monnet, Dorfles. , 1951
Photocollage by Gianni Monnet
Studio per tessuto, 1947
Tempera on paper
48 x 33,2 cm
Studio per tessuto, 1947
Tempera on paper
40 x 59,5 cm
Gianni Monnet, 1950
Photo
Lanfranco Bombelli, Gianni Monnet, Galleria del Grifo, Torino, 1950
Metamorfosi, 1949
Oil on masonite
60 x 73 cm
Circolo Ticinese di Cultura, 1947
Enten Eller, 1954
Typographic
23 x 33 cm
1 Cartella del M.A.C., 1948
48 x 34 cm
Documenti d'Arte d'Oggi, 1958
22,5 x 32 cm
Litografie originali di Monnet, 3 Cartella del M.A.C., 1949
46 x 33 cm
L'Arte Moderna dall'A alla Z, 1955
Typographic
11,5 x 32,5 cm
Senza titolo, 1949
Lithography
46 x 33 cm
Senza titolo, 1949
Lithography
46 x 33 cm
Senza titolo, 1949
Lithography
46 x 33 cm
Senza titolo, 1949
Lithography
46 x 33 cm
Senza titolo, 1949
Lithography
46 x 33 cm
Alemagna, 1947 CA.
Tempera on paper on masonite
70 x 100 cm
Configurazione n.6, 1953
Oil on masonite
60 x 81 cm
Configurazione n.5, 1953
Oil on masonite
60 x 81 cm
Composizione , 1953
Ink and collage on paper
19 x 25 cm
Composizione , 1953
Ink and collage on paper
19 x 25 cm
Composizione , 1953
Ink and collage on cardboard
18,5 x 24,5
Galleria Schettini, Milano, Gianni Monnet e Bruno Munari MAC Espace. Ia rassegna nazionale di arte concreta Allestimento dell’Architetto Vittoriano Viganò Foto Martinotti, Milano. Courtesy Archivio Vittoriano Viganò, Milano, 1957
Photo vintage
Progetto per invito Libreria Salto, 1949
pencil on paper
21 x 10,5 cm
Progetto per Arte Concreta 14, 1953
Tempera and pencil on paper
16 x 16 cm
Progetto per la copertina di Arte Concreta 12, 1953
Tempera and collage on paper
16 x 16 cm
Progetti parietali, 1955
China and tempera on photograph (Vintage)
9,5 x 19 cm
Progetti parietali, 1954
China and tempera on photograph (Vintage)
12,5 x 19 cm
Progetti parietali, 1954
China and tempera on photograph (Vintage)
13 x 18,7 cm
Provetti parietali, 1954
China and tempera on photograph (Vintage)
13 x 19 cm
Progetti parietali, 1954
China and tempera on photograph (Vintage)
12,5 x 17,5 cm

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